Thursday, September 22, 2016

Study Shows Occupational Therapy is the Only Spending Category that Reduces Hospital Readmissions

9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf


Health Policy Researchers Find Occupational Therapy is Only Spending Category That Reduces Hospital Readmissions



9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf


Health Policy Researchers Find Occupational Therapy is Only Spending Category That Reduces Hospital Readmissions



9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
A recent study found that 'occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has statistically significant association with lower readmission rates'.


The authors point out that 'occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients' functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.'

The researchers point out that occupational therapy 'focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates-can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?'  Occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks.  They cite six particular interventions provided by OT's that lower readmissions:
  • Provide recommendations for caregivers.
  • Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  • Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g. using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  • Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  • Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  • Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
For more information click here:  http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx

Warmly,
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf

An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf


9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf


9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf
9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf


Health Policy Researchers Find Occupational Therapy is Only Spending Category That Reduces Hospital Readmissions



9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf



Health Policy Researchers Find Occupational Therapy is Only Spending Category That Reduces Hospital Readmissions




9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf



Health Policy Researchers Find Occupational Therapy is Only Spending Category That Reduces Hospital Readmissions




9/13/2016
An independent study by health policy researchers published in Medical Care Research and Review (Rogers, Bai, Lavin, & Anderson, 2016) found that “occupational therapy is the only spending category where additional spending has a statistically significant association with lower readmission rates” for the three health conditions studied: heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction.
The authors point out that “occupational therapy places a unique and immediate focus on patients’ functional and social needs, which can be important drivers of readmission if left unaddressed.”
Researchers Andrew Rogers (Johns Hopkins University), Ge Bai (Johns Hopkins), Robert A. Levin (University of Maryland School of Medicine), and Gerard F. Anderson (Johns Hopkins) used Medicare claims and cost data to examine the association between hospital spending for specific services and 30-day admission rates for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction. They evaluated 19 distinct spending categories (including occupational therapy) in 2,791 hospitals for the heart failure analysis; 2,818 hospitals for the pneumonia analysis; and 1,595 hospitals for the acute myocardial infarction analysis.
The researchers point out that occupational therapy “focuses on a vital issue related to readmission rates—can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” If not, occupational therapists address issues from physical barriers to daily function to support networks. They cite six particular interventions provided by occupational therapists that could lower readmissions:
  1. Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
  2. Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require further rehabilitation or nursing care.
  3. Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living (e.g., using the bathroom, bathing, getting dressed, making a meal).
  4. Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
  5. Assess cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary.
  6. Work with physical therapists to increase the intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.
The researchers identify occupational therapy as “one spending category that affects both the clinical and social determinants of health” and note that “investing in OT has the potential to improve care quality without significantly increasing overall hospital spending.”
“The findings of this important study highlight just one of the many roles occupational therapy practitioners are playing in improving quality and reducing healthcare costs,” said AOTA Executive Director Fred Somers. “Occupational therapy practitioners are proving to be an essential member of any interprofessional team successfully addressing the changing demands of the health care delivery system.”
Rogers, A. T., Bai, G., Lavin, R. A., & Anderson, G. F. (2016, September 2). Higher hospital spending on occupational therapy is associated with lower readmission rates. Medical Care Research and Review, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558716666981
- See more at: http://www.aota.org/Publications-News/AOTANews/2016/Occupational-Therapy-Reduces-Hospital-Readmissions.aspx#sthash.NCCqShI7.dpuf

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Autism-Friendly Design with Flip Schrameijer


Contribution by Flip Schrameijer to the conference-book ‘Autism-friendly design’, held October 9th 2015 in London

In her excellent 2011 review of the state of autism-friendly design, Maria Assirelli took her own involvement in it as point of departure; and with good reason since she recounted how, in 2005, she took a job at GA Architects, a firm in the vanguard of building for children on the spectrum. Founding partner of the firm, Christopher Beaver wrote the first of a limited number of ground-breaking articles on this subject in 2003 which he elaborated in 2006.






My own involvement started in 2009 when the Dutch autism centre Dr. Leo Kannerhuis asked me to write a brochure to exhibit the expertise in design it had acquired through its participation in the building of numerous treatment and long-stay homes for autistic patients and residents in The Netherlands. This centre – lets call it The Kannerhouse – treats patients and develops innovative programs such as around work and education. Its main policy is ‘life coaching’, in which people on the spectrum are provided with sufficient professional support to live (semi-)independent and fulfilling lives. Of course, if homes adapted to the needs of people on the spectrum were available, their chances to stay away from, or limit their institutionalization would increase. Consequently, the Kannerhouse sought to increase its consultancy requests in order to set up a regular paid service on a budget-neutral basis. For this it had to widen the circle of interested parties which was an important reason to expand its areas of interest beyond treatment and long-stay homes to include independent living, schools, and living at home. (The workplace was deemed one bridge too far.)


Click here to read more: http://www.architectuur-voor-autisme.org/autism-friendly-design-a-view-on-its-present-and-future-state/?lang=en

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Walk-In Showers and More Best Bath Products with Joe Hayden

I've been working with Best Bath products for years.  I was sold on the quality and the ease of installation but found out there was a lot I didn't know.  This video is a presentation by Joe Hayden from Best Bath giving a detailed look at Best Bath products including walk-in showers and grab bars.  This information is important for anyone doing wheelchair accessible or aging-in-place home modifications.

A big thank you to Joe Hayden for educating occupational therapists on bathroom accessibility.


Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

AOTA Conference 2016-Home Modification Road Trip Starts to Rock

What's a road trip without music?  Here's an amateur music video about the Frank Lloyd Wright, Fred Sammons, Chicago Botanic/Enabling Gardens road trip, check it out.




Friday, March 18, 2016

Join the Chicago Botanic Gardens, Enabling Gardens Horticultural Therapy Program Tour


Barb Kreski supervisor of the Horticultural Therapy Services department at the Chicago Botanic Garden will be guiding a tour on Wednesday, April 6th the day before the 2016 AOTA conference in Chicago, explaining the Enabling Gardens programs. 

Click here to join us on our tour.


Check out the video below to learn more about our tour and the Chicago Botanic Garden's Enabling Gardens.

Kreski's background spans a wide range of clinical settings including psychiatric hospitals, the Hines Veterans Administration Hospital, skilled nursing facilities, public schools, and pediatric rehabilitation. She has incorporated plant- and nature-based interventions in her work in each of these settings. She holds a master's degree in health sciences with a concentration in neuroscience and an undergraduate degree in occupational therapy as well as voluntary registration as a horticultural therapist.






Here are links from Barb to the Horticultural Therapy programs:

http://www.chicagobotanic.org/education/certificate_programs/healthcare   Gardens That Heal (1 day symposium)  and  Healthcare Garden Design Certificate (8 day program)

http://willsull.net/  Head of Landscape Architecture at University of Illinois.  Website has lots of good information.  Dr. Sullivan is n the faculty of our program and will present at Gardens that Heal

http://www.chicagobotanic.org/therapy  Horticultural Therapy at Chicago Botanic Garden pages

Ever have trouble with operating a door? This video gives you insight on doors and great design

Great article/video on great design. 


http://www.remodeling.hw.net/newsletter/designing-the-best-door_c?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=Brief&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=REM_030316%20%281%29&he=

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